Category Archives: things that make sense

Bicycle Rolling Stop Animation – Idaho Stop Law

Check out Urban Velo’s post about a new proposed bike law in Oregon based on a law that now exists in Idaho. It allows cyclists to treat stop signs as yield signs, so they don’t have to loose momentum by coming to a complete stop when the intersection is clear. But it does continue to make “flying through a stop sign” illegal and increases the fine.

In New Orleans, I’m pretty sure 95% of us already treat stop signs as yield signs, but there are a good 5% or so percent that don’t stop or yield – they just fly right through causing dangerous situations for themselves, drivers, and pedestrians. Perhaps legalizing rolling stops for cyclists and taking on a strong public advertising campaign to explain the law would help with the situation. Apparently, the rolling stop law has worked really well in Idaho and the state overall has a very good bike safety record.

Bicycle Rolling Stop Animation – Idaho Stop Law

Bicycles, Rolling Stops, and the Idaho Stop from Spencer Boomhower on Vimeo.

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Transport for NOLA – new transit advocacy group getting started in New Orleans

Straight from my e-mail inbox to your computer screen – It’s finally happening! People have come together to make a multi-modal transportation advocacy group for New Orleans! We’re talking bikes, buses, light rail, streetcars, pedestrians, unicycles, hovercrafts, mules & horses (alright, maybe not too many horses because biking through poo is no fun).

But seriously, folks, Transportation Alternative in NYC has made a huge impact on improving mass transit and bicycle and pedestrian amenities and advocating for the people of the city who decide not to drive. Transport NOLA is bringing that multi-modal, “we’re all in this together,” model of advocacy to New Orleans. Transport NOLA is starting their campaign by focusing on rail improvements, especially pushing for a light rail system that will serve the entire city and just not a handful of neighborhoods like our current streetcar system. Check out the “Where” section and you’ll see where bike and pedestrian facilities come into play too. (I’m not too crazy about this “bike lane in the middle of streetcar tracks” idea in the Tulane Station model, but maybe with modern streetcars, you and do it up so wheels don’t get caught. I’ll look into this and make sure a bunch of poorly designed bike lanes don’t end up all over the city.)

I knew this was brewin‘, but I was really surprised to see how quickly this has come together. The website looks great and they already have some concept designs online!

The kick-off event is THIS FRIDAY at the Rusty Nail (1100 Constance St in the Warehouse District a few blocks south of Lee Circle) from 6-9 pm.

I, of course, will not be there due to this “you have to be in Cincinnati to take classes”/”you’re too close to graduation to transfer” situation, but you should really go and get involved. This will be an excellent opportunity to create a forum in which all of us (advocates and users are various non-personal motor vehicle transportation modes) can come together, and work together, to improve the city and region.

Louisiana 3 Feet


Louisiana State Representation Michael Jackson has introduced a law into the state legislator to require drivers to give cyclists 3 feet of space and to make harassing cyclists a crime.

Recently New Orleanian Dr. Colin Goodier was killed by a driver on River Road in Baton Rouge. The Baton Rouge Tiger Cycling Foundation started campaigning for 3 feet laws in response to his death and others in the Baton Rouge area.

The Baton Rouge Bike Club and Crescent City Cyclists are asking people to send a thank you e-mail to Rep. Jackson to introducing this bill. To add to that, NolaCycle would like to ask you e-mail or call your local representative and tell him or her that you support this measure and would like to see additional legislation to promote cycling.

"City Plans Upgrades To Area Streetscapes" From WDSU

New Orleans is getting serious about streetscape improvement! The article mentions that bike racks will be added to these streets (’bout time!), but nothing about bike lanes. These projects are focused on small stretches of roads, the main business-districts of neighborhoods, not entire corridors like Wisner or St. Claude where bike facilities have been added.

Robert Mendoza from Public Works said in the article people should start seeing work done by this summer, and the entire phase of the project should be complete by next year. I’m not sure if he means just the Canal Street and Alcee Fortier Boulevard projects or all of them. The article isn’t very clear.

Anyway, check out this article and attend the public meetings if they’re happening in your neighborhood.

The Ninth Ward streetscape meeting will take place at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Martin Luther King Jr. School at 1617 Caffin Ave.

The Broad Street and Lafitte streetscape meeting will be 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at 3700 Canal St.

Here’s the list of all the streetscape projects:
· Bayou Road (Broad Street to Rocheblave Street)
· Elysian Fields Avenue (Foy Street to St. Aloysius/Stephen Girard Street)
· Gentilly Boulevard (Pauger Street to Elysian Fields Avenue)
· Caton Street (Norman Meyer Avenue to Elysian Fields Avenue)
· Freret Street (Jefferson Avenue to Napoleon Avenue)
· Alcee Fortier Boulevard (Chef Menteur Highway to the Michoud Lagoon)
· Read Boulevard (I-10 to Dwyer Road)
· Lake Forest Boulevard (Bundy Road to Wright Boulevard)
· Crowder Boulevard (I-10 to Dwyer Road)
· O.C. Haley Boulevard (Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard – US90B)
· General Pershing Street (S. Broad Street to S. Miro Street)
· St. Roch Avenue (Marais Street to N. Derbigny Street)
· S. Clark Street (Tulane Avenue to Banks Street)
· D’hemecourt Street (S. Clark Street to S. Jefferson Davis Parkway)
· Baudin Street (S. Clark Street to S. Jefferson Davis Parkway)
· Harrison Avenue (Orleans Avenue to West End Boulevard)
· N. Claiborne Avenue (Esplanade Avenue to St. Anthony Street)
· St. Bernard Avenue (N. Claiborne Avenue to Miro Street)
· General Meyer Avenue (Hendee Street to Odeon Avenue)
· S. Claiborne Avenue (Napoleon Avenue to Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard)
· S. Carrollton Avenue (Stroelitz Street to I-10)
· Washington Avenue (Short Street to S. Carrollton Avenue)
· Dixon Street (Dublin Street to S. Carrollton Avenue)

Wisner bike path opens! More on the way!

Photo: Chris Granger

From the Times-Picayune (Dan is once again interviewed – he’s such a rock star. I think all the female journalists at T-P have a crush on him. Only thing that explains how often he gets quoted.)

“The long-awaited Wisner bike path officially opens today, one of three projects completed this year that double the miles of cycling trails in New Orleans.

And there’s more to come.

The 4.7-mile hybrid path — which stretches from Lafitte Street at North Jefferson Davis Parkway, along the Bayou St. John side of City Park, to Beauregard Avenue and Lakeshore Drive — will be followed by three other bike projects.

By November of next year, bike lanes, such as those on St. Claude Avenue, will probably likely be completed on Harrison Avenue, from Marconi Drive to Wisner Boulevard; on Robert E. Lee Boulevard, from St. Bernard Avenue to Paris Avenue; and on Louisiana Avenue, from St. Charles Avenue to Magazine Street, said Robert Mendoza, the city’s director of public works.

The growth of bike lanes, shared lanes and bike paths in New Orleans increases the odds that the city will be able to obtain more federal money to create infrastructure for pedestrians and cyclists, said Dan Jatres, program manager for the Regional Planning Commission’s Greater New Orleans Pedestrian and Bicycle Program.

“Wisner — a north-south path — is another down payment on the future for an interconnected system,” said Jatres, who said that the University of New Orleans, the Regional Planning Commission and the Department of Public Works are collaborating to obtain money via a federal transportation bill.

The federal government provided 95 percent of the financing for the $1.4 million Wisner project, and a Wisner foundation grant provided the remaining 5 percent.

The hybrid path includes a mix of 10-foot-wide concrete paths and existing roads marked with bicycle symbols and bike-route signs. A 1.7-mile concrete path has been placed between Wisner Boulevard and the bayou from Milton Street to Robert E. Lee Boulevard. And a two-block concrete section has been built between Esplanade Avenue and West Moss Street.

The streets with signs and symbols that inform motorists they are sharing a lane with cyclists include Moss, Lelong Drive, Golf Drive, Zachary Taylor Drive, Beauregard and Lakeshore Drive. Some of those streets wind through City Park.

And for much of the ride, cyclists will be able to travel from Lake Pontchartrain to City Park without having to deal with regular traffic,” said Bao Vu, a project manager for the city’s Department of Public Works.

The Wisner project, as Mayor Ray Nagin sees it, “will greatly enhance the quality of life for our youth and families.”

With the exception of a limited stretch alongside the south end of Bayou St. John, the Wisner path connects the Xavier community with the lakefront, with the South Jefferson Davis Parkway path covering part of the route. The new project enhances recreational opportunities, creating a safe place for walkers, bikers and runners, Nagin said.

With the addition of Wisner, the city now has 19.8 miles of cycling infrastructure, including 2.6 miles of bike lanes, 10.3 miles of bike paths separated from city streets and 6.9 miles of shared lanes, said Jatres, who will gather with others today at 10:30 a.m. at the corner of Harrison Avenue and Wisner Boulevard in City Park to celebrate the opening of the Wisner trail.” By Leslie Williams.